Signs Of The Times RSS

Signs of the Times: The World for People who Think. Featuring independent, unbiased, alternative news and commentary on world events.
Signs of the Times
  1. At least 14 people have been killed in southern Somalia after torrential rains triggered flash floods that have caused havoc in several towns and villages. Bridges, roads and houses have been damaged or destroyed and many people have been forced to flee their homes in search of safer ground. In the town of Baardhere in Jubaland state, 14 people were killed including three members of the same family, district commissioner Mohamed Weli Yusuf told reporters. "Most of the casualties were caused after the victims were trapped across a bridge in the town Thursday evening which was swept up in the floods," he said.
  2. Arizona officials are searching for a large coyote that reportedly injured two toddlers in separate attacks in Scottsdale this week. Kelly Pirozzi told ABC News she was standing in her driveway on Wednesday when the coyote approached and bit her 21-month-old son on the arm in a shocking moment caught on her surveillance camera. The coyote knocked the toddler down, and once the boy started crying, the animal released his arm from its grip, Pirozzi said. She then rushed her son into the house. Pirozzi said he's OK and only suffered minor bite marks. "It happened so quickly," she said.
  3. More than 350 sheep and goats died due to lightning in Uttarkashi, Uttarakhand on Saturday night. According to media reports, three people from Barsu village of Bhatwadi block were taking more than a thousand sheep and goats from Rishikesh to Uttarkashi. At night they reached Khatukhal in Dunda tehsil. During this time it was raining continuously and there was a strong storm. Lightning struck at around 9 o'clock in the night and more than 350 sheep and goats died due to its grip. Due to the death of so many animals together, the people of the village got scared. He informed Vineeta Rawat, the head of the Bhatwadi block, about the incident. Vinita Rawat told the DM and the District Disaster Management Department about the incident.
  4. This video shows a gorgeous bolide recorded on March 21, at 22:14 local time (equivalent to 21:14 universal time). The fireball was observed by a wide number of casual eyewitnesses, who reported it on social networks. The event was generated by a rock (a meteoroid) from an asteroid that hit the atmosphere at about 69,000 km/h. The fireball overflew Spain and the Mediterranean Sea. It began at an altitude of about 86 km over the Mediterranean Sea, moved northwest, and ended at a height of around 40 km over Hinojar (province of Murcia). This bright meteor was recorded in the framework of the SMART project, operated by the Southwestern Europe Meteor Network (SWEMN) from the meteor-observing stations located at La Hita (Toledo), Calar Alto, Sierra Nevada, La Sagra (Granada), and Sevilla. The event has been analyzed by the principal investigator of the SMART project: Dr. Jose M. Madiedo, from the Institute of Astrophysics of Andalusia (IAA-CSIC).
  5. Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg's "hush money" case against Donald Trump is bursting at the seams, with US legal experts ridiculing the DA's effort to put the former president behind bars, and some Democratic lawmakers warning against using the US court system as a pawn in a political game. Last Saturday, former President Donald Trump signaled that he could be arrested on March 21 in connection with an ongoing investigation by Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg concerning Trump's alleged 2016 payment of $130,000 in hush money to adult movie star Stormy Daniels. Trump's announcement triggered a lively debate, with US conservatives lambasting Bragg for pushing what they called a heavily politicized case. The potential indictment, mentioned by Trump, should have followed a series of testimonies by former Trump attorney Michael Cohen, a disbarred lawyer and convicted felon who turned against his former client. While many saw Cohen as Bragg's future "star witness" in a...
  6. In the mad dash to pursue all things electric for the sake of climate change, Ford Motors has invested heavily in the production of electric vehicles. So far, things are not going according to plan. Ford is losing billions on this in 2023 and it's only March. The Associated Press reports:
  7. Researchers have discovered a way to "translate" quantum information between different kinds of quantum technologies, with significant implications for quantum computing, communication, and networking. The research was published in the journal Nature on Wednesday. It represents a new way to convert quantum information from the format used by quantum computers to the format needed for quantum communication. Photons — particles of light — are essential for quantum information technologies, but different technologies use them at different frequencies. For example, some of the most common quantum computing technology is based on superconducting qubits, such as those used by tech giants Google and IBM; these qubits store quantum information in photons that move at microwave frequencies. But if you want to build a quantum network, or connect quantum computers, you can't send around microwave photons because their grip on their quantum information is too weak to survive the trip.
  8. Switzerland's decision to rescue failing investment bank Credit Suisse could be a major burden for the nation's taxpayers, according to Bloomberg calculations. The Swiss government has pledged to absorb 9 billion Swiss francs ($9.7 billion) of the bank's losses and provide a 100 billion-franc ($108 billion) public liquidity backstop from the Swiss National Bank (SNB). This means that each resident out of Switzerland's 8.7 million population will pay 12,500 francs ($13,500) for the bank's rescue, Bloomberg noted. The deal also mentions a separate guarantee of 100 billion francs from the Swiss central bank that isn't backed by the government. Adding the 50 billion-franc loan from the SNB which the bank secured last week, the total sum of the rescue will top 259 billion francs ($280 billion), which is equivalent to about a third of Switzerland's entire economic output in 2022. The amount will make the deal Switzerland's largest ever corporate rescue, far surpassing the 60...
  9. Dozens of patients and families whose lives have been damaged by extremely rare reactions to the Oxford/AstraZeneca covid vaccine have launched legal action against the pharmaceutical company. While the vaccine is widely credited with protecting many millions of people from the virus, 81 patients died and 364 suffered severe reactions, some of them resulting in catastrophic injuries as a result of blood clots caused by the jab. Legal action is now being taken against AstraZeneca by the families of 19 people who died after being vaccinated and 54 patients who suffered severe reactions but survived. Strokes, paralysis and repeated blood clots are among the symptoms of those who suffered very rare but severe reactions to the vaccine. Many have gone from being fit and healthy to being left struggling to walk and talk, with little hope of getting better. Comment: Severe reactions to the covid vaccines are anything but rare. This is the case moreso with mRNA "vaccines" although we may...
  10. Two men have been sentenced to life in prison in India for a 2014 killing that was reportedly solved thanks in part to the dead woman's pet parrot, which is believed to have witnessed the murder. Special Judge Mohammed Rashid sentenced Ashu Sharma and Ronnie Massey to life in prison plus a fine of 72,000 rupees ($874) on Thursday based on evidence collected after Sharma confessed to killing his aunt, Neelam Sharma, with the help of his friend. The pair entered the victim's home in Agra on February 20, 2014, when her husband was away at a wedding with their children. They stabbed her 14 times and even stabbed her pet dog nine times, Neelam's daughter Nivedita Sharma told India Today. Her cousin had intended to "kill and loot," she explained, as he knew where the couple stored their cash and jewelry, having visited his aunt's house many times and even stayed there for years. Her father Vijay had even given his nephew 80,000 rupees ($972) toward an MBA degree.
  11. Stocks of Germany's Deutsche and Commerzbank fell sharply on Friday over investors' fear over the health of the European banking sector. Deutsche Bank shares plummeted over 14% on early trade on Friday as borrowing costs surged over increased financial risks following the collapse of major banks in the past few weeks, spreading heightened fear over the future of the banking sector, AFP reported. The stock value of Germany's biggest lender rebounded almost 6 percent on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange, closing at 8.54 euros. The cost of the bank's debt insurance against default risk fell as investors' trust in the financial sector dropped. The collapse of US' SVB and two other banks, in addition to the chaotic takeover of Credit Suisse by UBS - enforced by the Swiss government - left markets in turmoil.
  12. The Notre-Dame de Paris is the first known cathedral of Gothic-style architecture to be initially constructed with extensive use of iron to bind stones together. The 2019 fire that significantly damaged the cathedral enabled analyses leading to this discovery, by Maxime L'Héritier of Université Paris 8, France and colleagues, who present these findings in PLOS ONE on March 15, 2023. At the time of its construction in the mid-12th century, Notre-Dame was the tallest building ever erected, reaching a height of 32 meters. Previous research suggests that this record was made possible by combining a number of architectural innovations. However, despite extensive use of iron reinforcements in more recent cathedrals and in efforts to restore old buildings, it has been unclear what role iron might have played in Notre-Dame's initial construction.
  13. The British government plans to move asylum seekers from hotels to military bases or disused ferries under plans that could be announced as early as next week, a report has revealed. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is expected to announce the "beginning of the end" of asylum hotels, which are currently being used to house asylum seekers as part of the government's legal obligation to provide people seeking help with a basic level of accommodation, the Telegraph newspaper reported on Sunday. More than 50,000 migrants are currently housed at a cost of nearly £7 million a day in the hotels, the report said.
  14. Russia has reached an agreement with Belarus to station tactical nuclear weapons on its smaller neighbour's territory, so bringing some of its arsenal closer to the rest of Europe, Vladimir Putin has said. The Russian president made the announcement on state television, arguing that it would not breach non-proliferation agreements and that it would match similar arrangements that the US has with several of its European allies. Putin said he was acting after negotiations with Belarus's president, Alexander Lukashenko, who he said had "long raised the question" of a nuclear deployment on his country's territory.
  15. The European Union will thank Poland for the supply of weapons to the Kyiv regime. This was stated by Prime Minister of Poland Mateusz Morawiecki, speaking to reporters following the results of the EU summit in Brussels. Morawiecki noted that Warsaw is waiting for "very good compensation" for playing one of the leading roles in supplying Ukraine with a variety of weapons and military equipment. Earlier, the Polish leadership proudly stated that Poland is in second place after the United States in the list of countries providing military assistance to Ukraine.
  16. Two former White House officials said President Biden is frustrated with Vice President Kamala Harris' performance — even if he remains committed to keeping her as his running mate in the 2024 election, a new report reveals. The 80-year-old Biden, who has gone out of his way to praise Harris in recent public remarks, reportedly has griped about his No. 2's reluctance to take on risky assignments. One former White House official told Reuters: "A point of tension in their relationship is that I don't think that the president sees her as somebody who takes anything off of his plate" due to a "fear of messing up. If he did not think she was capable, he would not have picked her. But it is a question of consistently rising to the occasion. I think his running for re-election is less about her and more about him, but I do think that she and the Democratic bench [are] a factor." Another former White House official told the wire service that Biden, already the oldest-ever president,...
  17. Nobody can give a precise dollar-number to U.S. 'Defense' spending because the U.S. 'Defense' Department has never been able to pass an audit, and is by far the most corrupt of all federal Departments (and is the ONLY Department that has never passed an audit), and also because much of America's military spending is being paid out from other federal Departments in order to keep down the published annual U.S. Government 'Defense' expenditure numbers (which come from ONLY the U.S. 'Defense' Department). Those are expenditures for America's privatized and overwhelmingly profit-driven Military-Industrial Complex. (By contrast: Russia and China require, by law, that their armaments-firms be majority-owned by the Government itself.) According to the best available estimates, the U.S. Government has been spending, in total, for over a decade now, around $1.3T to $1.5T annually on 'defense', and this is around half of all military spending worldwide by all 200-or-so nations, and is more...
  18. Soldiers of Ukraine's 'Thor' special operations group are using satellite data provided by the CIA to choose targets when conducting drone strikes against Russian forces, the unit's commander told The Times. The 27-man group, which is formally a police special operations unit, functions independently from the Ukrainian army and works in close collaboration with the country's military intelligence, the GUR, which provides them with ammunition and intel. According to The Times, the unit has complete license to select its missions, where it barracks and when it fights. The unit's commander, whose name is said to also be Thor, claims he uses a special application on a tablet that is synced to a CIA satellite to select potential targets for their attacks. Thor told the outlet: "We select targets in the program, and targets can be placed there both by the CIA satellite and by our own satellite, which our volunteers pay for. Information is collected from all kinds of sources there. We...
  19. There are various degrees of acceptable insanity, but in general you would not want a person who thought a toad had the same intrinsic value as your mother to manage her Alzheimer's disease. You would not want a person who equated the value of your daughter with that of a rat to decide whether she be injected with medicine still under trial, such as an mRNA vaccine. Or perhaps you would, as you may agree with the Lancet editorial in January 2023 that equates these, insisting: "All life is equal, and of equal concern." Whatever value system you apply to other humans, it is important to understand that international public health is currently dominated by such rhetoric, if not such thinking. This will greatly influence society and your health for the next few decades. The Lancet is one of the most influential international medical journals. The above passage is not taken out of context. The editorial recommends we change the way society is managed: Taking a fundamentally different...
  20. What's happened to Maria Zee is a sign of what's in store for all of us. In Soviet Russia and Maoist China, communism was a government affair. If you were reported by a colleague or family member as expressing beliefs contrary to the ideology of the state, or complaining about the lack of potatoes in the shops, you would be hauled in for questioning. Generally, you were a goner unless you dobbed in someone else for real or imaginary crimes against the Party, or turned informant. Files released after the fall of the Berlin Wall showed one in six East Germans were informants on their family, friends and neighbours. Just as we didn't get class Marxism but instead identity Marxism in the West, we haven't got government communism, either. Not in the same way as the Eurasian nations had it last century. The protections for citizens' rights in liberal democratic states proved too strong. Instead, in the West, communism got privatised. The Marxists evolved, like a virus; they put on suits...
  21. It could be argued that the basic arithmetic showing wind power is an economic and societal disaster in the making should be clear to a bright primary school child. Now the Oxford University mathematician and physicist, researcher at CERN and Fellow of Keble College, Emeritus Professor Wade Allison has done the sums. The U.K. is facing the likelihood of a failure in the electricity supply, he concludes. "Wind power fails on every count," he says, adding that governments are ignoring "overwhelming evidence" of the inadequacies of wind power, "and resorting to bluster rather than reasoned analysis". Professor Allison's dire warnings are contained in a short paper recently published by the Global Warming Policy Foundation. He notes that the energy provided by the Sun is "extremely weak", which is why it was unable to provide the energy to sustain even a small global population before the Industrial Revolution with an acceptable standard of living. A similar point was made recently in...
  22. I've been sitting on this train of thought for a while. I can't tell if it's crazy or not, so I've hesitated to write it up. But I can't quite dismiss this scenario out of hand, either. So be warned. Dot-connecting schizopost incoming. Now that the dust has settled from Corona, no one much wants to talk about it anymore. The normies who all went full Jonestown along with the Branch Covidians seem quietly embarrassed and reluctant to broach the subject, lest others be reminded of their rabid enthusiasm for masks, lockdowns, and forcing experimental gene therapies into children's arms. Likely some degree of growing disquiet over what they allowed into their cells plays a role there, too. The people who drove the normies mad in the first place especially don't want to dwell on the doom coof, lest they draw attention to their menticidal war crimes. Even the conspiracy theorists aren't terribly interested in talking about it, out of sheer exhaustion with the topic if nothing else. We've...
  23. Our WEF overlords may want us to 'eat ze bugs' and be happy, but Italians are having none of it, as their Government has banned the use of insect flour in pizza and pasta. The Times has more: The growing use in cooking of flour made from crickets, locusts and insect larvae has met fierce opposition in Italy, where the Government is to ban its use in pizza and pasta and segregate it on supermarket shelves. In a sign of fear that insects might be associated with Italian cuisine, three Government ministers called a press conference in Rome to announce four decrees aimed at a crackdown. "It's fundamental that these flours are not confused with food made in Italy," Francesco Lollobrigida, the agriculture minister, said. Packed with vitamins, proteins and minerals, flour made from crickets is increasingly seen as an ecological way to obtain nutrients, and the market is forecast to reach $3.5 billion by 2029. The EU has already authorised foods made from crickets, locusts and the darkling...
  24. The Pentagon does not have plans to discipline an employee who was the Department of Defense's chief officer of diversity, equity, and inclusion for their anti-white tweets that have come under fire from Republican lawmakers, according to a top DOD official. Kelisa Wing, the employee who has been found to have a history of tweets critical of white people, has been reassigned to a different role, Gilbert Cisneros Jr., undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness in the Biden administration, wrote in a Tuesday letter to House Republican Conference Chairwoman Elise Stefanik (R-NY). However, Wing has not faced discipline despite the DOD's determination that the employee was "speaking in a personal capacity," Cisneros, who was grilled by Republicans on Thursday during a House Armed Services Committee, added. "I do agree that that is not acceptable," Cisneros said in the hearing. "It's not something that I would condone, and it's not condoned by [Department of Defense Education...
  25. This week, March 20, saw the 20th anniversary of the U.S.-British war launched on Iraq. The war resulted in over one million deaths and a decade of brutal military occupation. It spawned sectarian civil war, millions of displaced and destitute, and terrorism that engulfed the entire Middle East, as well as large swathes of Africa and Asia. Iraq and several other ancient nations have been destroyed because of the Anglo-American war. And it was a war based on flagrant American and British lies over alleged Iraqi weapons of mass destruction. The 20th anniversary of the U.S.-British war on Iraq, which was also supported by NATO partners, should be an occasion for proper accounting with Nuremberg-standard war crimes prosecutions of American and British political and military figures. Persons such as George W Bush, the former U.S. President, and Tony Blair, the ex-British premier, should be facing jail time for capital crimes. The current U.S. President Joe Biden should also be in the...
  26. Naked eye aurora australis visible from Franklin, Tasmania on the night of 23/3/2023. All the colours visible in this footage were visible to the naked eye, which is extremely rare for Aurora. This is easily the biggest and brightest aurora display I've seen in the 23 years I have been chasing aurora. It doesn't get much better than this from Australia. Aurora gets such a bad wrap for being colourless, but once it got bright enough the colour receptors in my eyes suddenly switched on. It was like upgrading from a B&W TV to full HD.
  27. Day 1 of the Canada Stong and Free Networking Conference kicked off in Ottawa on Wednesday, and included in the first day's lineup was a panel on Bills C-11 and C-18. Both bills have been shrouded in controversy and blasted for their impact on freedom of speech, access to the news, and content creation in Canada. Rachel Curran, Head of Public Policy for Meta Canada, expressed concern over the way the bills would regulate user-generate content. She highlighted how the government allegedly did not want to regulate user-generated content, however an amendment that was rejected by the house suggests "there is probably some indication there that the government DOES want to get at user-generated content. We're concerned about that."
  28. At least 23 people died in a "destructive" tornado outbreak that rolled across Mississippi late Friday, leaving a trail of damage for more than 100 miles, local and federal authorities said. The Mississippi Emergency Management Agency said at least 23 people have died, and there are "dozens injured." Four people are missing. Search and rescue operations were underway in Sharkey and Humphreys counties, MSEMA said late Friday. The agency issued a series of tornado warnings in counties throughout the state. "Many in the MS Delta need your prayer and God's protection tonight," Gov. Tate Reeves said on Twitter. "We have activated medical support -- surging more ambulances and other emergency assets for those affected. Search and rescue is active." At least 13 people were dead, Sharkey County Coroner Angelia Easton told ABC News, adding that she could not yet confirm their ages. Jose Watson, a Mississippi Highway Patrol trooper, said another person died in Silver City, in Humphreys...
  29. On Monday, transgender flight attendant Kayleigh Scott was found dead in her Colorado home just hours after posting to Instagram that she was planning to end her life. Scott, 25, gained notoriety after being featured in a 2020 Transgender Day of Visibility ad campaign for United Airlines wherein she shared the story of her transition. "As I take my final breaths and exit this living earth," Scott wrote on Instagram, "I would like to apologize to everyone I let down. I am so sorry I could not be better. To those that I love, I am sorry I could not be stronger. To those that gave me their everything, I am sorry my effort was not reciprocated."
  30. The Pulitzer Prize winner has alleged the US blew up the pipelines because it was unhappy with a lack of German support for Ukraine. US President Joe Biden ordered the sabotage of the Nord Stream pipelines because he was unhappy with the level of support provided by German Chancellor Olaf Scholz to Ukraine in its conflict with Russia, veteran investigative journalist Seymour Hersh has claimed. Hersh first accused Washington of destroying the key European energy route in an article released in February, and made more allegations in an interview with the China Daily newspaper published on Friday.
  31. Canberra had tried but failed to prevent the violent criminal with deep extremist ties from traveling, local media has reported. Daniel Newman, a far-right extremist and a violent criminal, has flown from Australia to Ukraine to join the fight against Russian troops, Australia's Sydney Morning Herald (SMH) newspaper reported on Thursday, citing its sources. The development coincides with efforts by Canberra to prevent violent extremists from traveling to the war-torn country to gain combat experience, SMH said. Newman first traveled to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and then to Europe in February, before arriving in Ukraine this month, the report claims, adding that the man had supposedly told his associates he was planning to take up arms against Russian forces.
  32. The record-breaking snowfall this winter has been phenomenal, maybe even more so in the eyes of those who study it closely. The director of the Snow Hydrology Research to Operations Lab at the University of Utah said she could have never predicted that her equipment at the top of Little Cottonwood Canyon would ever be buried by snow. But that's exactly what happened. "The snow really has not stopped," said McKenzie Skiles, an assistant professor at the University of Utah, and head of the Snow Hydrology Research to Operations Lab. "This winter we've just been getting storm after storm after storm, and we have finally just matched the record for peak snow water equivalent that was set in 83." That record was later eclipsed in the afternoon. We caught up with her today in the midst of a snow squall, which seemed like the perfect setting.
  33. Pyongyang claimed the system is able to "annihilate enemy ship groups" without detection. North Korea has tested a new "underwater nuclear strategic weapon," claiming the platform can produce a "radioactive tsunami." Pyongyang claimed it has been forced to strengthen its "war deterrence" amid a flurry of military drills by Washington and Seoul. A series of tests were carried out between Tuesday and Thursday this week by the North Korean military and were overseen by supreme leader Kim Jong-un, the state-run Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) reported. The trials were intended to confirm the "lethal strike capability" of the new "secret weapon," which has been dubbed "Tsunami."
  34. Political tribalism protects America's leaders from being held accountable for everything from failed policies to war crimes. Washington is where securing political power means never having to say you're sorry - regardless of how many thousands or millions of people you might have gotten killed. Tribalism is what keeps the perpetrators from ever being held accountable. Consider, for example, this month's Axios/Ipsos poll showing that more than six in ten US adults believe that George W. Bush's 2003 invasion of Iraq was a mistake. While it might seem encouraging that most Americans have come to realize that the Iraq debacle was a bad move - sort of like recognizing that the sun comes up in the East - a glance beneath the headline number reveals that voters haven't really learned anything.
  35. Washington's purported superiority is meaningless as there would be no winner in an actual war, the former Russian president has warned. Any serious conflict involving the world's leading nuclear powers would "obviously" have no winner, former Russian President Dmitry Medvedev has outlined. As a result, comparing the strength of the Russian and American militaries is pointless, he added. The consequences of a nuclear war would be "monstrous" and make it "impossible to say which army was the first and which second," the senior official told the Russian media this week. The prowess of a military force is measured by the outcomes of its campaigns, added Medvedev, who is now the deputy chair of Russia's National Security Council.
  36. The energy regulator Ofgem is preparing to crack down on UK power firms to prevent them from "manipulating" the market with a manoeuvre that has bolstered their profits by millions of pounds. The practice, which does not break existing market rules, involves generators warning the electricity system operator that they are turning their power plants off at times of peak demand and subsequently offering to keep them running in exchange for a "balancing" payment. In some cases, the electricity system operator, which is owned by National Grid, has been left with little option other than to make payments of significantly above the market price to keep power plants from turning off and avoid the risk of winter blackouts.
  37. Pets could be subjected to gene editing under a new government act, the RSPCA has warned. The animal charity has said that the Genetic Technology (Precision Breeding) Act applies to all vertebrate animals, not only farmed animals, and that it could lead to cats and dogs being gene-edited to include extreme features. The law allows the creation and marketing of "precision-bred" or genome-edited plants and vertebrate animals in England. The government said it would allow farmers to grow crops that are drought- and disease-resistant, reduce the use of fertilisers and pesticides, and help breed animals that are protected from catching harmful diseases. Comment: Except GMO plants have not been shown to have any of these qualities, moreover these mutant crops are linked to numerous diseases in both animals and humans that consume them. These inferior crops harm the soil they're in, the creatures that have contact with them, and they possess the ability to contaminate the heritage plants...
  38. Scientists in Australia have unearthed 3.48 billion-year-old rock fragments that may be the earliest evidence of a meteorite crashing into Earth. The fragments, known as spherules, may have formed when the meteor slammed into the ground, spraying melted rock into the air. This melted rock then cooled and hardened into pinhead-size beads that became buried over the eons. Researchers presented this discovery, which has not been peer-reviewed, at the 54th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Texas last week. In a summary of their results , the scientists concluded that the spherules, which they drilled up from a group of volcanic and sedimentary rocks called the Dresser Formation of the Pilbara Craton in Western Australia, are "the oldest evidence of a potential bolide impact in the geologic record of Earth." (A bolide is a large meteor that explodes in the atmosphere while falling to Earth.)
  39. Bank of England Governor Andrew Bailey has warned firms hiking prices risk driving up the cost-of-living and hurting the "least well off". Mr Bailey also suggested that increasing prices may have a knock-on impact on interest rates. His comments follow a surprise increase in inflation on Wednesday and the central bank's decision to raise interest rates - the 11th rise in a row - from 4% to 4.25%. Comment: It's only a surprise to anyone who believes, against all evidence, that the economic situation is going to improve. Figures the same day showed food and soft drink prices rose by 18% year-on-year last month - the highest rate since August 1977.
  40. Transgender women who have experienced male puberty will not be permitted to compete in female world ranking competitions, the World Athletics announced Thursday. The international council opted to ban the swath of prospective athletes instead of continuing to follow its previous rules that placed parameters on the testosterone levels of transgender female athletes. Previously, transgender women were required to reduce their amount of blood testosterone to a maximum of 2.5 nanomoles for a period of 24 months to qualify for competition. After consulting with various stakeholders — including transgender representatives — World Athletics found there was "little support" for the regulations.
  41. ICYMI| St Louis DA Kim Gardner is in a world of hurt after she lost her appeal for refusing to turn over her communications with operatives of George Soros and others in her prosecution of former Gov Eric Greitens. A court has already found that she committed 62 acts of misconduct and 79 cases of misrepresentation in convicting Greitens of crimes he did not commit. He was later cleared and the extremely popular Greitens is now running for the US Senate from Missouri. Gardner has been a disaster for St Louis. Last year there more murders in St Louis than at any time in the last 50 years. Gardner has refused to prosecute so many murderers that the Missouri legislature had to pass a law limiting the time she had to file murder charges to 90 days. After that, the state Attorney General takes over the case. Gardner refused to prosecute cases of drug dealers and child molesters even when there was enough evidence to make them open and shut cases. Her excuse was that the police are...
  42. Depleted uranium shells promised to Kiev by the UK would "cause irreparable harm" to soldiers and civilians alike, Moscow claimed The potential use of British-supplied depleted uranium shells by Ukraine would have a devastating impact on the country's economy and population, lasting for centuries to come, the Russian Defense Ministry warned on Friday. Speaking at a briefing, Lieutenant General Igor Kirillov, who is in charge of Russia's Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Defense Forces, issued a scathing criticism of the UK's plans to support Kiev with armor-piercing rounds containing depleted uranium. He noted that such munitions have only ever been deployed in combat by NATO countries, most notably during the Iraq War, when the US used at least 300 tons of depleted uranium.
  43. As soon as the sun set Thursday, extreme weather photographer Peter Forister excitedly headed for the hills. Forecasts had suggested that recent storming on the surface of the sun could set off auroras — brilliant dancing streaks of light, also known as the northern lights — in the Lower 48 states. For the first hour or so into his night, his camera picked up pretty but rather demure purple hues in the sky, which appeared just as a white haze to the naked eye. Then, within 30 seconds at around 11 p.m., the sky lit up with vibrant red and yellow streaks visible to the naked eye. Forister sprinted up a hill with his camera and pushed through bushes that scratched and tore up his legs, but "it didn't matter," he said. "It was so exciting." "You just step back and jaw drop and just watch the show for a few minutes," Forister said. "It was really remarkable, like the kind of show that will make you stop and just catch your breath."
  44. A Democratic-led suburb in Colorado is doing its "obligation" to fight climate change — approving a proposed ban on all new gas stations. The city council in Louisville — 20 miles outside Denver — voted Tuesday to set the cap at six filling stations for its 21,000 residents. A seventh would be allowed only if it's part of a large retail center. Any new station would also be required to include at least two charging stations for electric vehicles — and be 1,000 feet away from an existing station. "I don't think any single action this council or community takes is going to fix climate change," council member Maxine Most said during the vote. "But I think it's a really good idea to decarbonize because it sends a signal and it sends a message."
  45. As TikTok CEO Shou Zi Chew faced questioning from the House Committee on Energy and Commerce on Capitol Hill, leaders from the United States government issued strong demands that TikTok stop spying on American citizens because that's the government's job. "Stay off our turf!" Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said to assembled members of the press. "How can the federal government be expected to effectively spy on all of our citizens if we've got this TikTok app and the Chinese Communist Party getting in our way trying to do the same thing? If anyone is going to be violating the privacy of the American people, it should be us!" Concerns continue to grow that the social media video app is harvesting private data from millions of American users and funneling it to the Chinese government, a charge that the TikTok CEO vehemently denies. "The Honorable and Most Excellent President Xi told me to say we do not collect sensitive data from our users," said Mr. Chew when questioned. "We...
  46. The Biden Administration continues to conceal its responsibility for the destruction of the Nord Stream pipelines... It's been six weeks since I published a report, based on anonymous sourcing, naming President Joe Biden as the official who ordered the mysterious destruction last September of Nord Stream 2, a new $11-billion pipeline that was scheduled to double the volume of natural gas delivered from Russia to Germany. The story gained traction in Germany and Western Europe, but was subject to a near media blackout in the US. Two weeks ago, after a visit by German Chancellor Olaf Scholz to Washington, US and German intelligence agencies attempted to add to the blackout by feeding the New York Times and the German weekly Die Zeit false cover stories to counter the report that Biden and US operatives were responsible for the pipelines' destruction. Press aides for the White House and Central Intelligence Agency have consistently denied that America was responsible for exploding the...
  47. President Joe Biden's order that federal employees get vaccinated against COVID-19 was blocked Thursday by a federal appeals court. The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans rejected arguments that Biden, as the nation's chief executive, has the same authority as the CEO of a private corporation to require that employees be vaccinated. The ruling from the full appeals court, 16 full-time judges at the time the case was argued, reversed an earlier ruling by a three-judge 5th Circuit panel that had upheld the vaccination requirement. Judge Andrew Oldham, nominated to the court by then-President Donald Trump, wrote the opinion for a 10-member majority. Opponents of the policy said it was an encroachment on federal workers' lives that neither the Constitution nor federal statutes authorize. Biden issued an executive order last September requiring vaccinations for all executive branch agency employees, with exceptions for medical and religious reasons. The requirement kicked...
  48. In his extremely stupid book on How to Prevent the Next Pandemic, Bill Gates proposed expanding the World Health Organisation with a division of pandemic shock troops called the Global Epidemic Response and Mobilisation team, or GERM. He envisioned a crack unit of 3,000 diversely talented technocrats who could be airdropped into a developing outbreak anywhere in the world and handle everything from subverting local human rights to sequencing random genomes. He was also very emphatic that he wanted more pandemic wargames, because they're fun events where he gets to hobnob with his favourite virus wizards and pose as an important philanthropist for the cameras.
  49. Attorney Robert Costello, the former legal adviser to Michael Cohen, spoke to Tucker Carlson on Monday night after he testified to the Manhattan Grand Jury investigating President Donald Trump. Costello told the FOX News audience that he testified for two hours in front of Alvin Bragg's Manhattan Grand Jury. Robert Costello told Tucker Carlson, "I spoke to the jury for two hours... It was clear to me the Manhattan Grand Jury did not want to get to the truth." And it now is being reported that New York District Attorney Alvin Bragg was HIDING exculpatory evidence from the Grand Jury! According to FOX News legal mind Gregg Jarrett, Soros-funded DA Alvin Bragg HID nearly 600 pages of exculpatory evidence to the New York Grand Jury investigating President Trump.
  50. There are still a number of unanswered questions about the incident that downed the MQ9 Predator off the coast of Crimea on Tuesday. Let us start with the facts: The MQ9 drone was conducting an Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance mission in international air space off the coast of Crimea. The MQ9 turned off its Identification, Friend or Foe (IFF) transponder. Russian air defense systems were tracking the drone. Russian jet fighters were scrambled to intercept the drone. The United States and NATO have been flying drones along the Crimea coast for more than a year. The drone was brought down without a shot being fired by the Russian combat jet fighters. So far the United States and Russian military are sticking with the same story — i.e, one of the planes clipped the drone's propeller accidentally, which cause the drone to crash. We are in full blown Kabuki theater. The United States insists this drone was harmless, just minding its own business, when an incompetent...