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Signs of the Times: The World for People who Think. Featuring independent, unbiased, alternative news and commentary on world events.
Signs of the Times
  1. That's what should have been the biggest news of 2021. Instead, the story, which broke on November 17, was largely ignored or buried. The nation's two main newspapers, the Washington Post and the New York Times, have simply ignored it. Other news organizations stenographically quoted Pentagon officials as admitting that they "failed again" but saw "progress," and as promising that they would achieve a "clean" audit by... get this... 2027. The Pentagon, with some $3 trillion (give or take a trillion but who's counting?) in assets and a record current 2021 budget of $738 billion, has for the third year in a row failed its audit. An army of 1400 auditors hired by us taxpayers for $230 million and borrowed from some of the biggest auditing firms in the country, spent the past year poring through the books and visiting hundreds of operations of the government's largest and geographically vastest single agency, and came back with word that they couldn't give it a pass. They couldn't...
  2. A tiny administrative agency in the District of Columbia announced a new policy Tuesday that will likely serve as a model for a whole-of-government push to assemble lists of Americans who object on religious grounds to a COVID-19 vaccine. The Pretrial Services Agency for the District of Columbia — a federal independent entity that assists officers in the District of Columbia courts in formulating release recommendations and providing supervision and services to defendants awaiting trial — announced a new records system that will store the names and "personal religious information" of all employees who make "religious accommodation requests for religious exception from the federally mandated vaccination requirement." The announcement does not explain why the agency needs to create this list except to say that it will "assist the Agency in the collecting, storing, dissemination, and disposal of employee religious exemption request information collected and maintained by the Agency."...
  3. Junior academics cited by "Forbes", AP, Reuters and "The Independent" have not done their homework Today in "factchecking the factcheckers", junior academics cited by Forbes, Associated Press, Reuters and The Independent have just not done their homework concerning the work of Professor Dr. Mattias Desmet of the University of Ghent in Belgum. All I can say about this is that I hope that their naive, ignorant, grandstanding statements to the press are brought up during their future Academic Tenure and Advancement reviews. But there has been an amazingly coordinated effort to shoot the messenger and actively character assassinate (or "defenstrate") me as a surrogate while avoiding any reference to the highly credentialed academic Professor Dr. Mattias Desmet who actually developed the theory and has documented the extensive evidence in an upcoming academic book. So, what can we learn from this in the short term? Clearly, Google was not the only corporation triggered by Joe Rogan...
  4. You know time is running out on the false reality in which most Americans live when the corporate-owned mainstream media starts to report some of the things that we in the alternative media have been reporting for years. I've been warning since 2018: America is heading toward civil war. For the last six months or so many of us have been warning about the creaky supply chain. That chain is getting ready to buckle and break like a water pipe in the dead of winter, when frigid air sneaks in from the north. It usually happens in the middle of the night, while everyone is sleeping in their warm beds. Under the stress of steadily dropping temperatures, the pipe starts to expand. Now compromised, the pipe starts to drip, then suddenly it pops. Water gushes out and into the house. At that point, you have a big mess on your hands. If only you'd seen the cold weather coming, you would have wrapped your pipes and protected them from the damage. That's how I see the U.S. supply chain right...
  5. Comment: The Aussie pathocrats sure milked this for all it's worth... Serbian tennis star Novak Djokovic was deported Sunday after losing an 11th-hour bid in an Australian federal court to save his chances to compete in the Australian Open after refusing to be vaccinated against COVID-19. The Australian federal court unanimously found that Immigration Minister Alex Hawke was within his legal rights to cancel Djokovic's visa for the second time Friday on the grounds that the tennis star's views on vaccines posed a risk to the public health and "good order" of the country. Djokovic has won nine Australian Open titles, including the past three, and was seeking a record 21st Grand Slam title. He is tied with Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer.
  6. The 2,000 year old skull of a Peruvian warrior was found to have been fused together with metal in one of the world's oldest examples of advanced surgery, according to a museum. The Museum of Osteology in Oklahoma says the skull, which is in its collection, is reported to have been that of a man who was injured during battle before having some of the earliest forms of surgery to implant a piece of metal in his head to repair the fracture. Experts told the Daily Star that the man survived the surgery, with the skull now a key piece of evidence in proving that ancient peoples were capable of performing advanced surgeries.
  7. Some areas in the city of Montevideo dawned Monday literally under water following unprecedented heavy rains which caused damages to various homes and a traffic chaos, in addition to power outages, which reportedly affected some 12,000 users. The storm reached its fiercest moment at around 6am, although social media users had been reporting all night that the situation was getting critical in different areas. Sources from Uruguay's weather agency Inumet quoted by local media reported unofficially that in two hours more than 100 millimeters of rain had fallen in Montevideo. In two hours Montevideo experienced what usually takes a whole month to fall, it was reported.
  8. If you want a barometer of how well Biden's disastrously ill-considered speech in Georgia on Tuesday went over, look at how the White House is now spinning it: President Joe Biden was not making a "human" comparison between opponents of pending voting rights bills and historical racists and segregationists in his address in Atlanta this week, the White House says. In his speech calling for new voter protections, Biden asked whether lawmakers wanted "to be the side of Dr. King or George Wallace," "John Lewis or Bull Connor" or "Abraham Lincoln or Jefferson Davis." The comparison generated some blowback afterward, but press secretary Jen Psaki said Biden was not drawing a personal link between current lawmakers and notorious southern segregationists and the president of the Confederacy. "I think everybody listening to that speech who's speaking on the level, as my mother would say, would note that he was not comparing them as humans, he was comparing the choice to those figures in...
  9. There has been an extraordinary amount of backpedaling of late on 'The Science', with official positions morphing into those held by 'conspiracy theorists' for the last two years. At the same time, however, there is as yet no rollback of the 'crowd control measures' introduced on the basis of said 'Science'. On this NewsReal, Joe and Niall cover the glaring contrast between official pronouncements about how mild the virus has become, and the increasingly extreme measures governments are nevertheless forcing on populations. In the second hour, they switch gears to discuss the increasing geopolitical tension between the US and Russia over 'who controls Europe', and the highly explosive Tonga volcano eruption that literally shook the world... Running Time: 01:55:24 Download: MP3 — 79.2 MB
  10. Neil Oliver goes there, directly to the epicenter of "build back better." In this monologue not only does Oliver highlight the connective tissue and motives of the elite, but he also references their words to point out the bigger leftist agenda at work. Point One - The "Build Back Better" agenda (in every nation) was never about anything except radical climate change legislation. Once you accept that baseline, things start to become much clearer. Point Two - The "Build Back Better" phrase came from the World Economic Forum and was promoted by a multitude of international leaders and left-wing organizations. That reality then brings up the most important point. To get to "building back better", you first need to destroy something. That thing they needed to destroy was the global economic dependency on carbon-based fuel supplies (oil, gas, coal, etc.). Point Three - In order to destroy the 'something of that scale', the energy program for the entire world, something massive is needed...
  11. It's an obvious point, but the obvious bears repeating. The absurd accusations of antisemitism against actress Emma Watson last week for expressing solidarity for Palestinians have backfired against Israeli leaders and in one bright flash helped to discredit an ancient tried-and-true strategy of the Israel lobby: maligning critics of Israel's policies as antisemites. Israel's supporters have been effective for years at muzzling critics by doing just that. The good news of the Emma Watson's smearing is that this time even establishment types raised an eyebrow over the strategy- and may even have noticed the anti-Palestinian bigotry that animates it. So we should embrace the Emma Watson moment, as another landmark in the march to the mainstream of Palestinian solidarity. Back to the episode: On January 2, Watson published a rather anodyne declaration of Solidarity with Palestinians with an image of a demonstration from last May, and Israeli ambassador Gilan Erdan lectured her about...
  12. A top Israeli reserve general had called for a repeat of the 1948 military operation that led to Israel's control over the Negev ("Naqab") Desert and the displacement of thousands of Palestinians. The general was commenting on protests by Palestinians in the Negev against Israeli razing of their lands. Major General Yom-Tov Samiah, who served as commander of the Southern Zone in the Israeli Army during the Second Intifada, said in a tweet: "Operation 'Yoav' will soon return to liberate the Negev. Luckily General Shaike Gavish [who led the operation at the time] is alive. He will pass on some lessons. If we continue at this rate of loss of control we will have to retake the Negev and Galilee. Civil war is on the doorstep." Operation 'Yoav' was launched by Israeli forces in October 1948 to capture the Negev Desert, when 23 Palestinian towns and villages were destroyed and their populations made refugees in Jordan, the West Bank, and Gaza.
  13. VAERS data released Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention included a total of 1,033,994 reports of adverse events from all age groups following COVID vaccines, including 21,745 deaths and 170,446 serious injuries between Dec. 14, 2020, and Jan. 7, 2022. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) today released new data showing a total of 1,033,994 reports of adverse events following COVID vaccines were submitted between Dec. 14, 2020, and Jan. 1, 2022, to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). VAERS is the primary government-funded system for reporting adverse vaccine reactions in the U.S. The data included a total of 21,745 reports of deaths — an increase of 363 over the previous week — and 170,446 reports of serious injuries, including deaths, during the same time period — up 3,840 compared with the previous week. Excluding "foreign reports" to VAERS, 723,042 adverse events, including 9,936 deaths and 64,406 serious injuries, were...
  14. Early data from Tonga's violent volcanic eruption suggests it is the biggest since Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines 30 years ago, volcanologist Shane Cronin says. The eruption of the underwater Hunga Tonga-Hunga Haʻapai volcano, about 65km north of Nuku'alofa, on Saturday shot thick ash and steam 20km skywards. University of Auckland volcanologist Professor Shane Cronin said scenes on the ground would have appeared apocalyptic after the eruption: ash clouds blotting out the sun, thunderclaps of booming shockwaves and thousands of lightening strikes. "The clouds that people could see in the distance, the booming noises and then the waves coming from the first tsunami...The next step is when the ash clouds spread across Tongatapu, and that ash cloud is so dense with fine ash particles that it blocks the sun completely, so it gets really dark." Cronin said rain, small pebbles and many centimetres of ash would have rained down. "This is an eruption best witnessed from space," he said.
  15. An old Chinese legend tells of the painter Wu Daozi (680-c760), who learned to paint so vividly that he was finally able to step inside his work and vanish into the landscape. Magical though it sounds, this legend iterates the common intuition that artworks are more like portals than ordinary objects: they can transport us into other worlds. When I look at Pieter Bruegel's The Hunters in the Snow (1565), I feel like I was there in the frost-bitten village, rather than the galleries of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. When reading Crime and Punishment (1866), the letters on the page conjure a whole world, and in some sense I am no longer in my living room but right there in Dostoevsky's Russia; the cinema, too, is a gateway to faraway galaxies and past centuries.
  16. Sir Keir Starmer has said he did not break any rules after being photographed drinking a beer with his staff during the spring lockdown. The Labour leader defended the photo, which re-emerged over the weekend, saying he was working on the Hartlepool by-election campaign and stopped to eat a takeaway with colleagues at a constituency office in Durham last May. At the time, people in England were not allowed to mix indoors apart from for work. "We were working, a takeaway turned up, and we stopped to eat it," Sir Keir told LBC. "We didn't break any rules, we did nothing wrong."
  17. Human rights group Amnesty International urged Italy to change tough anti-COVID-19 restrictions to avoid discrimination against unvaccinated people. In a recent decree, Mario Draghi's government made vaccination mandatory for everyone over the age of 50 and for use of public transport and a range of other services, one of very few countries to take similar steps, in an attempt to ease pressure on Italian health services and reduce fatalities.
  18. A major winter storm is creating havoc with cars, trucks and buses getting stuck in the snow all around the Greater Toronto Area. The snow came down quickly overnight with vehicles no match against the storm. It's estimated that over 30 cm of snow fell overnight and during the morning commute forcing police to shut down major highways. But as Marianne Dimain reports, the kindness of strangers is helping people keep moving as their cars get stuck in one of the biggest snow storms to hit southern Ontario in years.
  19. China's trade surplus hit a record high in 2021, boosted by strong exports that have topped market expectations since their pandemic recovery. For the full year, China's exports rose 29.9% to a new high of $3.36 trillion, beating 2020's record of $2.6 trillion, according to data released by the General Administration of Customs on Friday. Imports increased 30.1% in 2021, buoyed in part by soaring commodity prices. That translated to an annual trade surplus of $676.43 billion, surpassing the previous high of $593.9 billion in 2015, according to data provider Wind.
  20. In August, Germany's top newspaper, Bild, apologized for the outlet's fear-driven Covid coverage - with special message to children, who were told "that they were going to murder their grandma." Now, a newspaper in Denmark has publicly apologized for reporting government narratives surrounding the Covid-19 pandemic without questioning them. "We failed," reads the article's headline from tabloid Ekstra Bladet, which goes on to admit that "For ALMOST two years, we - the press and the population - have been almost hypnotically preoccupied with the authorities' daily coronavirus figures. "(translated).
  21. Prince Andrew may have once dated Ghislaine Maxwell, according to friends and a former royal protection officer who claims Jeffrey Epstein's madam was constantly "in and out" of Buckingham Palace. Former palace cop Paul Page said in a new documentary that Maxwell became a regular visitor from 2001, the year Andrew and his sex accuser, Virginia Roberts Giuffre, were photographed in Maxwell's London home. "From the way she was allowed to enter and exit the palace at will, we realized — suspected — that she may have had an intimate relationship with Prince Andrew," Page said.
  22. A winter storm combining high winds and ice was sweeping through parts of the south-east of the US, knocking out power, felling trees and fences and creating treacherous driving conditions. Tens of thousands of customers were without power in Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Florida. More than an inch of snow fell per hour in some parts of the Carolinas, Georgia, Tennessee and Virginia, according to the National Weather Service Storm Prediction Centre. The storm was making air travel extremely difficult in some parts of the south of the country. The nation's hardest-hit airport - Charlotte Douglas International - remained open around dawn on Sunday, the airport said in a weather briefing. But more than 1,000 Sunday flights in Charlotte were cancelled - more than 80 per cent of the airport's Sunday schedule, according to the flight tracking service flightaware.com.
  23. Former Hawaii congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard told "Hannity" Friday that Joe Biden's actions must "not go unchecked" and, the Biden administration is furthering the divide among Americans. TULSI GABBARD: "I think there were so many people across the country, those who voted for Joe Biden, those who did not vote for Joe Biden, who had high hopes that he would carry out his promise, that he would be the president for all Americans, showing respect for those who agreed with him or disagreed with him. And unfortunately, the opposite is true. Not only has he not carried out on that promise, he is literally doing the exact opposite, rapidly carrying our country in the wrong direction, tearing us apart, pouring fuel on the flames of divisiveness. And it just, I mean, it really makes me wonder how we can go through three more years of this and still come out the other end with the possibility of being able to come together again as Americans, as the United States of America.
  24. A research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) said Thursday that parents should do everything they can to avoid giving their children the coronavirus vaccine, insisting that the potential harm far outweighs the benefits. I think it is "outrageous to be giving vaccines to young people because they have a very, very low risk of dying from COVID," Dr. Stephanie Seneff said in an on-air interview with Laura Ingraham on Fox News Thursday evening. Seneff, a senior research scientist with MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, said the possible benefits for children from the coronavirus vaccine are minimal and "when you look at the potential harm from these vaccines, it just doesn't make any sense." Especially with repeated boosters such treatment "will be devastating in the long term," she added.
  25. A gene that causes bacteria to be resistant to one of the world's most important antibiotics, colistin, has been detected in sewer water in Georgia. The presence of the MCR-9 gene is a major concern for public health because it causes antimicrobial resistance, a problem that the World Health Organization has declared "one of the top 10 global public health threats facing humanity." Researchers from the University of Georgia's Center for Food Safety (CFS) collected sewage water from an urban setting in Georgia to test for the MCR gene in naturally present bacteria. Led by College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences assistant professor Issmat Kassem, whose research focuses on MCR's presence around the world, the team was surprised at how quickly they detected MCR — they found evidence of the gene in the first sample they took.
  26. Another 3,000 pigs out of the 16,000 at 19 farms in Paya Mengkuang, Masjid Tanah, Melaka will be culled by the end of this week to prevent the spread of the African swine fever (ASF) in the area. Department of Veterinary Services (DVS) director-general Datuk Dr Norlizan Mohd Noor said the ASF virus was first detected in Paya Mengkuang at the end of last month and within two weeks, 19 of the 35 pig farms in the area were confirmed to have been infected by the highly contagious virus. "(We are) forced to cull the pigs as we have a stamping-out policy, meaning, any pig at an enclosure or farm confirmed to be positive for the ASF virus has to be destroyed," he said, adding that until Sunday (Jan 16), 13,000 pigs were culled under the Animal Welfare Practice Code-Animal Disposal Management by using a high concentration of CO2 gas.
  27. A fire broke out at a gas station at a highway service area in the German state of Hesse on Monday, killing two people and damaging vehicles and a restaurant, police said. They said a witness reported a small explosion at around midday, with a fire breaking out near the pumps shortly afterward. The body of one victim was found in one of two cars damaged by the fire, and another dead person was found nearby, they said.
  28. It is possible the Tongan volcanic eruption could lead to a slightly cooler winter and possibly beautiful sunsets in the southern hemisphere this winter. When a volcano erupts, it releases huge amounts of sulphur dioxide (SO2) into the air, which bounces some of the sun's radiation away. Climate scientist Jim Salinger has researched the impacts of major volcanic eruptions, including Pinatubo, on the climate in New Zealand. He said it was not nearly as large eruption as Pinatubo, and would not have a global impact on the climate, but there could be some local effects in the Southern Hemisphere. Dr Salinger said it could take a few months to kick in and have cooling of about 0.1 to 0.5 degrees, lasting until spring.
  29. BEIJING -- A study showed that the ancient relatives of modern humans in northern China may have had an "Einstein's brain" at the time they lived 200,000 to 160,000 years ago. An international team led by Chinese archaeologists found that the cranial capacity of this hominin reached 1,700 cubic centimeters, an estimate made on the basis of skull fossils excavated in the 1970s from Xujiayao site. "It is the largest big-headed hominin ever in the Middle Pleistocene," said Wu Xiujie, a researcher at the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology under the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Wu's team reconstructed a fairly complete posterior cranium with three fragmented bones from the same young adult. Xujiayao hominid's brain was slightly smaller than that of its close relative "Xuchang Man," estimated at about 1,800 cubic centimeters, but the former lived approximately 60,000 years earlier than the latter, according to the study published in the latest volume of Journal of...
  30. Researchers at ETH Zurich have demonstrated in the lab how well a mineral common at the boundary between the Earth's core and mantle conducts heat. This leads them to suspect that the Earth's heat may dissipate sooner than previously thought. The evolution of our Earth is the story of its cooling: 4.5 billion years ago, extreme temperatures prevailed on the surface of the young Earth, and it was covered by a deep ocean of magma. Over millions of years, the planet's surface cooled to form a brittle crust. However, the enormous thermal energy emanating from the Earth's interior set dynamic processes in motion, such as mantle convection, plate tectonics and volcanism. Still unanswered, though, are the questions of how fast the Earth cooled and how long it might take for this ongoing cooling to bring the aforementioned heat-​driven processes to a halt. One possible answer may lie in the thermal conductivity of the minerals that form the boundary between the Earth's core and mantle.
  31. A doctor with decades of experience can't practice medicine after her license was temporarily suspended over complaints that she shared coronavirus misinformation, according to a Maine licensing board. The board has ordered her to undergo a neuropsychological evaluation, it said. Dr. Meryl J. Nass, who got a license to practice medicine in Maine in 1997, had her license "immediately" suspended for 30 days after a board investigation and review of complaints against her on Jan. 12, according to a suspension order from the Maine Board of Licensure in Medicine. Nass, who's an internist in Ellsworth, must "submit" to an evaluation by a "Board-selected psychologist" on Feb. 1, the board's evaluation order issued Jan. 11 said.
  32. I'm sure I don't need to tell you that there are many ways that the current global crisis could play out in 2022 and, sadly, none of them involve everyone joining hands and singing "Kumbaya" until the Gateses and the Schwabs of the world have a change of heart about this whole Great Reset thing. If you saw New World Next Year 2022, you'll know that I think a cyber 9/11 (and the ensuing passage of an iPatriot Act) is a distinct possibility for the coming year. But that is not the only Ace card in the would-be world controllers' hands. A "pandemic of the injected" and/or a 5G-generated global health crisis? The passage of a global pandemic treaty to hardwire the biosecurity state into place? A bioterror false flag? Check. Check. Check. All of these cards, too, are in the deck and ready to be dealt. But there is another card in that deck that has been largely neglected for the past two years and I have a feeling we're going to see it laid on the table this year. So what am I talking...
  33. The underwater Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai eruption has already triggered a tsunami, a sonic boom and thousands of lightning bolts, and could now lead to acid rain The massive explosion of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai volcano in Tonga on Saturday was its most powerful eruption since AD 1100. The after-effects have been felt around the globe and the damage is still being assessed. The volcano, located about 65 kilometres north of Tonga's capital, Nuku'alofa, exploded with violent force at 5:10pm local time on 15 January. Satellite images show a mushroom cloud of ash billowing 30 kilometres high and later sweeping more than 3000 kilometres west to Australia.
  34. While some still claim SARS-CoV-2 doesn't actually exist, this seems to fly in the face of several well-established facts. The virus has actually been photomicrographed,1,2 whole-genome sequences of the various strains are available,3,4 and with the appropriate credentials anyone can obtain the live virus to conduct research. While I am absolutely no fan of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, they do grow the virus in cell culture to ensure widespread availability for researchers who want to study it.5 Examples of research where you need the actual virus include antiviral research, vaccine development, virus stability research and pathogenesis research.6 What's the Confusion? At least part of the confusion appears to be rooted in how the term "isolated" is defined. Some insist a virus is not isolated unless it's also purified, while others say a virus doesn't have to be purified in order to be "isolated."
  35. Novak Djokovic returned to a hero's welcome in Serbia on Monday after Australia deported the world men's tennis No. 1 for being unvaccinated against COVID-19, a stance jeopardizing his quest for a record 21st Grand Slam title. Most Australians had wanted him gone, but Serbian supporters waved national flags and lauded him on arrival at Belgrade airport. "You are our champion, Novak!" and "We love you, Nole!" they chanted, using his diminutive name. The 34-year-old "King of Melbourne" had won nine previous Australia Opens, is level with Rafa Nadal and Roger Federer on 20 titles, and was top men's seed for the tournament that got underway on Monday.
  36. In the latest wave of hysteria unleashed by the globalist, corporatist establishment, a sizable chunk of humanity has been manipulated into a mass formation of fear and division. Expert opinions that contradict the unending emergency narrative are erased from public areas of the internet almost as fast as they are produced. Quickly eroding are the rights to free speech, assembly and association, freedom of religion and from discrimination, the rights to travel, medical privacy, and even equality. We were told these are science based, temporary, emergency measures, but if that were the intention, we would have clear, unchanging criteria for how the emergency will end. And so, the great othering has begun, and a massive divide has opened across society. On one side, you have the true believers - whose leaders, even in the most generous estimation, are wildly incompetent poll panderers who habitually violate their own edicts. For now, they are also joined by the meek and naive...
  37. On this Martin Luther King Day weekend, I will be visiting Athens, Texas (a town south of Dallas) for a free public screening of my documentary Human Zoos, which explores the sordid legacy of scientific racism and eugenics in America. I'd like to think that the event will be a fitting activity for MLK Day weekend, because King was a powerful opponent of both scientific racism and scientific materialism. Dr. King accepted the animal ancestry of humans as taught by Darwinian evolution, but he was sharply critical of the misuse of science to promote racial discrimination, and he also spoke forcefully against the idea that humans are the products of a blind material process. Many of King's thoughts on science are interspersed throughout a short book titled Strength to Love, a collection of sermons King originally published in 1963. I've been reading the book on my trip to Texas, and much of its wisdom is just as pertinent today as when the book was first published.
  38. An in-depth look at the Tonga eruption which sent ash to 95,000 feet and that ash cloud is heading to Australia. What does this mean for global agriculture and crop yields, food pricing and can we foresee any other large eruptions from now to 2024? Sources
  39. The Australian government has officially allowed visitors who can prove they have been fully vaccinated with Russia's Sputnik V Covid vaccine to enter the country, starting from Monday. Australia's Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) said it reviewed data provided by Moscow which shows that the vaccine "provides protection and potentially reduces the likelihood that an incoming traveler would transmit Covid-19 infection to others while in Australia or become acutely unwell due to Covid-19." "The data indicated that two doses of the Sputnik V (Gamaleya Institute) showed an average efficacy against symptomatic infection of 89% and against hospitalization or death of 98-100%," the regulator said in a statement on its website. Comment: That it has taken nearly a year for Australia to approve Russia's jab and that the EU still doesn't recognize it, and with no reasonable justification given for the delay, further demonstrates how the whole process is political and has nothing to do...
  40. We received one report about a fireball seen over Rajasthan on Sunday, January 2nd 2022 around 20:07 UT. For this event, we received one video.
  41. Just over six million Hungarians have received at least two shots, and 3.3 million have also received the third booster. Over a thousand people marched in Budapest protesting against Covid-19 inoculation at a rally organised by the far-right Our Homeland Movement, which has been campaigning on a fierce anti-vaccine and anti-immigration message ahead of April 3 elections. "Vaccines should not be mandatory! We don't tolerate blackmail," said the slogan of the rally where people held up banners saying: "I am unvaccinated, not a criminal" and "Enough of Covid dictatorship."
  42. The heavy downpour in Uberlândia (Minas Gerais) on Sunday, January 16, flooded homes and businesses in the city. The city of Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brazil, registered floods in several areas after heavy rainfall on Sunday afternoon, January 16. Videos show the damage caused by the waters, which swept away cars and flooded homes and stores. The Uberlândia City Hall said on social networks that an emergency task force was set up to mitigate the impacts of the rain.
  43. The Turkish A haber TV reported in the early hours of Monday that the coast guard had helped anchor the cargo ship in the Sariyer Buyukdere area and traffic in the Bosphorus returned to normal. The passage of ships was temporarily blocked to all vessels in both directions at Bosphorus late on Sunday because a freighter broke down near Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge, blocking the strait, Turkey's Directorate General of Coastal Safety said. The failure of the 'Brave Night' ship's engine was named as the cause of the breakdown. "Traffic has been stopped in both directions after a freighter heading to Romania broke down near Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge," the agency tweeted.
  44. We received 42 reports about a fireball seen over Distrito Federal, Goiás, Minas Gerais and São Paulo on Friday, January 14th 2022 around 23:51 UT. For this event, we received 4 videos.
  45. With so much debate going on over what really happened at the Pentagon on 9/11, and the obvious dire lack of coherent commentators to put and end to it once and for all, I decided that it was high time that I added my own reality-based voice to the debate and, in doing so, allow common sense to finally prevail over the ranting of wild-eyed, hairy-knuckled, missing link type conspiracy theorists and liberals alike.
  46. Earlier this week Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger announced that he will investigate himself after credible allegations came forward recently related to 2020 elections fraud in the state. John Solomon at Just the News reported this evening: Georgia authorities have launched an investigation into an allegation of systematic ballot harvesting during the state's 2020 general election and subsequent U.S. Senate runoff and may soon issue subpoenas to secure evidence, Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger confirmed to Just the News. Georgia law strictly prohibits third-party activists from picking up and delivering ballots on behalf of voters, a tactic called "harvesting" that liberal organizers have tried to get legalized in many battleground states without success. The U.S. Supreme Court this summer rejected Democrat efforts to overturn an Arizona law that outlawed harvesting in the battleground state. Unfortunately, Raffensperger is the Secretary of State in...
  47. The state of Virginia will no longer require school children to wear masks and state employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19. Newly sworn-in Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin has pulled mandates requiring children to wear masks and state employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19 as part of his first day in office. After defeating Democratic candidate and former Virginia governor Terry McAuliffe in the November 2021 gubernatorial election, Youngkin - a Republican - stuck by his pledge to lift sweeping coronavirus restrictions imposed by his predecessor.
  48. More than 50,000 people protested against stricter Covid-19 measures in France on Saturday, as the upper house of parliament approved a bill introducing a vaccine pass. Around 54,000 people protested across the country, including 7,000 who marched in the capital, according to the Interior Ministry. Some held banners that read "Freedom" and "Democracy in danger." "I'm against the vaccine pass. I'm against mass vaccination - everyone must be free to choose," a protester in Paris told Ruptly video agency.
  49. Microsoft Word has started offering 'politically correct' alternatives to some words and expressions, but a new "inclusive language feature" has left many users unimpressed. The tech giant announced last year that it was working "to remove non-inclusive language commonly found within the technology and cybersecurity sectors." In line with that goal, the latest version of Microsoft Word in Office 365 has an additional editor tool that suggests "more inclusive" alternatives to commonly used words and phrases that might offend someone in relation to gender, age, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. When the new function is used, any potentially offensive words, like all other 'errors,' are underlined, allowing the writer to fix them if they wish.
  50. Cars were submerged under water and streets were turned into turbulent rivers in Israeli cities over the weekend after torrential rain and cold weather battered the nation and led to flash flooding. A neighborhood housing some 18,000 people in the Israeli city of Lod was completely cut off by floods, Israeli media reported on Sunday. Local authorities warned the residents that the only way to get in or out of the area was by train. Locals told the media that life in the area had come to a halt, with even health clinics and Covid testing centers ceasing operation. Elsewhere in Israel, floods turned city streets into rivers and saw cars submerged under water. Rescue services were deployed to save people trapped in their vehicles.