Signs Of The Times RSS

Signs of the Times: The World for People who Think. Featuring independent, unbiased, alternative news and commentary on world events.
Signs of the Times
  1. Tornado hits Tangará, Santa Catarina, Brazil. August 14th, 2020.
  2. The device was mapping shoreline erosion when it was attacked in the air. A bald eagle took down a government drone in Michigan, state officials said Thursday. The bird of prey attacked the Phantom 4 Pro Advanced quadcopter drone about 162 feet in the sky on July 21, "tearing off a propeller and sending the aircraft to the bottom of Lake Michigan," according to the state Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy.
  3. Three people died as heavy rains lashed the Indian city of Jaipur, flooding low-lying areas of Rajasthan state's capital. Fifty families were moved to safety from affected areas in the city and about the same number were rescued, the Press Trust of India reported. At least one vehicle was swept away by currents while crossing a bridge in the Kanota area where a dam had overflown, according to the report. The deluge comes after Mumbai, home to India's financial markets and the central bank, last week suffered its heaviest daily downpour for the month of August in 47 years, flooding large parts of the mega city and disrupting businesses and services.
  4. Conservative pundit Bill Mitchell has been kicked off Twitter, saying his opposition to face masks first earned him a suspension, which became permanent after he unwittingly violated the rules by tweeting from a second account. Mitchell announced his ban in a post on Parler on Friday, laying his Twitter handle to rest after accumulating more than 600,000 followers. Earning regular retweets from President Donald Trump, the account was a source of controversy, at times backing 'QAnon' conspiracy theories and voicing skepticism toward Covid-19, among other things. "Twitter just suspended me for opposing masks. Who knows if I'll ever be back," Mitchell wrote, adding sarcastically "I'm sure their decision wasn't political at all."
  5. Mexico's majestic Popocatepetl volcano rumbled to life on Friday (August 14), spewing smoke and ash columns some 600 meters (1968 feet) out from its crater. The eruption occurred at 0727 local time (1227 GMT). The massive plume of gas and ash then dispersed towards the southeast, according to reports. Mexico's National Center for Disaster Prevention has warned people to stay away from Popocatepetl, reporting that in the previous 24 hours it had observed more than 36 discharges from the volcano. Popocatepetl is 5,426 meters (17,802 feet) tall and is the second-highest mountain in Mexico and the fifth-highest in North America. Source: Reuters
  6. On July 27, 2020, a group of frontline doctors in the US held a gathering in Washington D.C. where they expressed their concerns with COVID from a frontline doctor point of view. We reported: Frontline doctors from across the US held a "White Coat Summit" on Monday in Washington DC to dispel the misinformation and myths surrounding the coronavirus. The doctors are very concerned with the disinformation campaign being played out in the far left American media today.
  7. President Trump on Thursday said he hopes U.S. Attorney John Durham, who is investigating the origins of the Russia probe, is "not going to be politically correct" and warned that Attorney General William Barr could go down as "the greatest attorney general" or just "an average guy" — depending on what comes out of the monthslong probe. During an exclusive interview with FOX Business' Maria Bartiromo, the president was asked about the Durham probe, which the Justice Department has said could yield some results by next month. "I hope he's doing a great job, and I hope they're not going to be politically correct," Trump said. "Obama knew everything. Vice President Biden, as dumb as he may be, knew everything, and everybody else knew."
  8. The Australian is under fire for publishing an allegedly racist cartoon that depicts US Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden referring to his running mate Kamala Harris as "this little brown girl." The cartoon by artist Johannes Leak was published in Rupert Murdoch's The Australian newspaper earlier this week, in an apparent attempt to deride the US Democratic party for perceived tokenism and racially motivated pandering, according to the paper's editor-in-chief, Christopher Dore. The controversial cartoon depicts a smiling Biden announcing that it's time to "heal a nation divided by racism" before beckoning Harris to the podium while he goes "for a lie-down." Needless to say, the backlash was swift and immediate online from the woke sectors of the Twitter commentariat.
  9. Despite the deluge of data that continues to come in indicating that the coronavirus may not be the death sentence that the mainstream media has made it out to be, the sharp overreaction from those who can't help but be scared half to death from the virus continues unabated. The latest example comes to us from the Wisconsin's Department of Natural Resources, who told its employees that effective August 1, they would have to wear a mask - even for teleconferences. Preston Cole of the DNR said in an e-mail to employees: "Also, wear your mask, even if you are home, to participate in a virtual meeting that involves being seen — such as on Zoom or another video-conferencing platform — by non-DNR staff. Set the safety example which shows you as a DNR public service employee care about the safety and health of others." Gov. Tony Evers had put a mask order in place effective August 1 that mandates masks are to be worn whenever a person is in an enclosed space other than a private...
  10. This bright meteor overflew Spain on 2020 August 14 at about 3:10 local time (equivalent to 1:10 universal time). It was generated by a rock from a comet that hit the atmosphere at around 86,000 km/h. It began at an altitude of about 107 km over the province of Toledo, and ended at a height of around 57 km. The total length travelled by the meteoroid in the atmosphere was of about 63 km. The event was recorded in the framework of the SMART project, which is being conducted by the Southwestern Europe Meteor Network (SWEMN). The event was spotted from the meteor-observing stations located at La Hita (Toledo), Sierra Nevada (Granada), and Seville.
  11. Four days ago the Conversation - an "independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community" - published an article headlined: 'Morality pills' may be the US's best shot at ending the coronavirus pandemic, according to one ethicist The article's author is Parker Crutchfield, an Associate Professor of Medical Ethics, Humanities and Law at Western Michigan University, and his argument can be broken down into four key points: Wearing masks and social distancing are good for public health People who refuse to follow these rules are "defectors" who need to be "morally enhanced" This moral enhancement can be achieved with medication to make people more "empathetic" and "co-operative" This medication should be compulsory and/or administered secretly via the water supply.
  12. Corruption complaints made about Queensland politicians and candidates will be kept under wraps in the lead-up to elections as part of new laws introduced to State Parliament, with fines of more than $6000 or up to six months imprisonment. The revelations follow commentary by Crime and Corruption Commission chairman Alan MacSporran at the conclusion of the corruption investigation into a school principal appointment involving former deputy premier Jackie Trad. Attorney-General Yvette D'Ath told Parliament the bill came at a "critical time" as Queensland headed to the polls in October, and would prevent media from publicising corruption complaints within the caretaker period. The LNP has previously pushed to ban the practice of publicising referrals to the corruption watchdog. The laws will mean media such as print, digital, radio and television will be banned from publicising any corruption complaint during the caretaker period.
  13. William Binney is the former technical director of the U.S. National Security Agency who worked at the agency for 30 years. He is a respected independent critic of how American intelligence services abuse their powers to illegally spy on private communications of U.S. citizens and around the globe. Given his expert inside knowledge, it is worth paying attention to what Binney says. In a media interview this week, he dismissed the so-called Russiagate scandal as a "fabrication" orchestrated by the American Central Intelligence Agency. Many other observers have come to the same conclusion about allegations that Russia interfered in the 2016 U.S. elections with the objective of helping Donald Trump get elected. But what is particularly valuable about Binney's judgment is that he cites technical analysis disproving the Russiagate narrative. That narrative remains dominant among U.S. intelligence officials, politicians and pundits, especially those affiliated with the Democrat party, as...
  14. On August 4, hours before a massive explosion rocked the Lebanese capital, Beirut, Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, issued an ominous warning to Lebanon. "We hit a cell and now we hit the dispatchers. I suggest to all of them, including Hezbollah, to consider this," Netanyahu said during an official tour of a military facility in central Israel. Netanyahu's warning did not bode well for Israel when, hours later, a Hiroshima-like blast devastated entire sectors of Beirut. Those who suspected Israeli involvement in the deadly explosion had one more reason to point fingers at Tel Aviv. In politics and in war, truth is the first casualty. We may never know precisely what transpired in the moments preceding the Beirut blast. Somehow, it may not matter at all, because the narrative regarding Lebanon's many tragedies is as splintered as the country's political landscape. Judging by statements and positions adopted by the country's various parties and factions, many seem to be...
  15. More than 1 in 3 Americans surveyed in a NPR-PBS NewsHour-Marist poll released Friday say they will not get a coronavirus vaccine once it is available. Thirty-five percent of respondents said they would not take the vaccine, 60 percent said they would and 5 percent said they were unsure. Those with college degrees are 19 points more likely to take a vaccine than those without, 72 percent to 53 percent. Democrats were also more likely to be willing to take the vaccine than Republicans, 71 percent to 48 percent. The poll noted that in 2009 only 51 percent said they would take a vaccine for H1N1, though that disease was less deadly and had a narrower impact on daily life. Comment: The difference in "deadliness" between H1N1 and Covid-19 are close to negligible.
  16. When one of the brightest stars in the night sky began dimming in 2019, astronomers scrambled to figure out if this giant sun was about to explode or not. The mystery behind this unexpected darkness has now finally been solved.
  17. French authorities have arrested three members of the country's external intelligence service for planning a murder outside the exercise of their functions. Two of the men from France's General Directorate for External Security were arrested in the night between July 23 and July 24 in Créteil, a southeastern suburb of Paris, because it looked like they were "about to carry out a criminal act on a 54-year-old woman," the prosecutor's office revealed in a statement on Wednesday. Police, alerted by a local resident, found them in a stolen car with a fake licence plate. Both were wearing gloves and had army-issue knives. Officers also retrieved a 9 mm-calibre handgun. Police also identified and arrested a third person — a private security agent — believed to have assisted in the organisation of the murder plot.
  18. The UK's economic output shrunk by 20.4% in the second quarter of 2020, plunging the country into its deepest recession since records began. But as bad as that was, things will only get much worse, unless there's a complete change of course from the government and the Coronavirus Act is repealed. It's official. Britain's GDP fell by more than any other G7 nation in the three months to June. Most of that time the economy was in some form of lockdown. Those of us who warned of the dire consequences of shutting down the economy for such a long period were attacked at the time, but too many it seems were lulled into a false sense of security by Chancellor Rishi 'Sunny, Smiley' Sunak's furlough schemes. What was so bad about staying at home for a few weeks (originally it was supposed to be only three but then of course it became much longer), and getting paid by The State to do it? That was the prevailing view.
  19. Joe Biden announced Tuesday he has chosen Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) as his running mate, a person the presumptive Democrat nominee described as a "fearless fighter for the little guy, and one of the country's finest public servants." During Harris's tenure as San Francisco's chief prosecutor, however, she showed no signs of fighting for "the little guy" when she failed to prosecute any of the sexual abuse claims brought against Catholic priests in the city, despite outcries from victim groups. In fact, as Breitbart News senior contributor Peter Schweizer, president of the Government Accountability Institute, observed in his book titled Profiles in Corruption: Abuse of Power by America's Progressive Elite, during her 13-year tenure as district attorney and then attorney general, Harris failed to prosecute even one case of priest sexual abuse, though during that same period at least 50 major cities had brought charges against priests.
  20. YouTube will remove videos containing "hacked information" about election candidates if it deems them aimed at election meddling. The censorship is supposedly needed to protect the integrity of democratic institutions in the US. The Google-owned video platform explained on Thursday how it intends to protect users from malign actors during election campaigns and allow apparently benign actors to better engage with voters. Among other things, YouTube will delete videos that contain "hacked information, the disclosure of which may interfere with democratic processes such as elections and censuses," Leslie Miller, Google's vice president of government affairs and public policy, wrote in the corporate blog. For example, videos that contain hacked information about a political candidate shared with the intent to interfere in an election.
  21. Former FBI attorney Kevin Clinesmith intends to plead guilty to falsifying a document to justify surveillance of a former Trump campaign adviser as part of the 2016 investigation into Russian interference in the presidential election, according to several outlets. His plea is the first criminal case brought by U.S. Attorney John Durham, whom Attorney General William Barr appointed to lead the investigation into the origins of the Russia investigation. Clinesmith is accused of altering an email that said Trump campaign adviser Carter Page was not a source for the CIA, even though Page had had a relationship with the agency. The FBI in turn did not disclose Page's relationship with the CIA, allowing them to renew a warrant to monitor for potentially working with foreign powers. Clinesmith's lawyers reportedly said this was unintentional.
  22. A region in Spain has introduced a ban on smoking in outdoor public places when social distancing cannot be guaranteed. The ban came into effect Thursday in Spain's northwestern region of Galicia, with other areas mulling similar restrictions to curb the spread of the coronavirus. Under a law approved by the regional government of Galicia late on Wednesday which came into force at midnight, removing a face mask to smoke in public is not allowed if it is not possible to maintain a distance of two meters (6.7 feet) between people. The move is supported by research from Spain's health ministry, who last month found that smoking can spread the virus because people project droplets when they exhale smoke. In addition, the virus could be spread when a person removes their face mask to smoke a cigarette, and by touching their cigarette before bringing it to their mouth.
  23. President Trump polled his aides on Thursday about whether he should let anti-surveillance whistleblower and leaker Edward Snowden return to the US from Russia without going to prison, saying he was open to it. "There are a lot of people that think that he is not being treated fairly. I mean, I hear that," Trump told The Post in an exclusive interview in the Oval Office, before soliciting views from his staff. Trump commented on Snowden for the first time as president after accusing former President Barack Obama of spying on his 2016 campaign. "When you look at [former FBI Director James] Comey and [former FBI Deputy Director Andrew] McCabe, and [former CIA Director John] Brennan — and, excuse me, the man that sat at this desk, President Obama, got caught spying on my campaign with Biden. Biden and Obama, and they got caught spying on the campaign," Trump said.
  24. The remains of several timber circles constructed over 4,500 years ago have been discovered at the Perdigões complex archaeological site in Portugal. Though some news outlets have described the circles as a "woodhenge," akin to the famous Neolithic monument of Stonehenge, archaeologists prefer not to call it that - instead referring to them a "Timber Circles." While the archaeologists prefer a different name the design is similar with wooden posts encircling an area. "We interpret it as a ceremonial place and prefer to refer to it as timber circles," said António Valera, an archaeologist with the Era Arqueologia company, who is leading excavations at the site. Only about a third of the timber circles have been excavated so far, and only post holes and ditches from the circles remain. There is an opening in the Timer Circles that appears to be aligned to the summer solstice — the longest day of the year — Valera told Live Science.
  25. China has launched a "CLEAN YOUR PLATE" campaign, indicating that we are entering a global food crisis and moreover that it is YOUR fault for wasting too much food. Eating shows are being censored from the internet, and social media sites are telling users to "value food." Restaurants are limited, no longer able to serve meals to each person! And "AgriFoodTech" companies are working to "Upcycle" food waste and FEED IT BACK TO YOU as other foods... or even an innocent looking cup of coffee. Christian breaks down this next-level nanny state encroachments and this latest salvo -- which sets the tone for the rest of the world -- in the war on food. Sources
  26. A bald eagle launched an attack on a drone belonging to a Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) pilot last month, sending the drone plummeting to the depths of Lake Michigan. The drone was helping to map erosion along the shoreline of the lake when the eagle, which was entirely unprovoked, decided that skies weren't big enough for the two of them and decided to rip a propeller off of the Phantom 4 Advanced quadcopter, reports WLUC. EGLE environmental quality analyst and drone pilot Hunter King had captured roughly seven minutes of footage before the satellite reception began to break up. King pressed the "Go Home" button to recall the drone and began to reacquire a stronger satellite feed when things took an unpredictable turn.
  27. Flooding in Sudan has affected over 180,000 people across 17 states, with over 40 fatalities reported. Recent flooding began in the country after heavy rainfall in late July. Damage was reported in parts of Khartoum and a dam collapsed in Blue Nile state.
  28. Trump announced that the US, Israel and the UAE have agreed to a plan that would trade an Israeli pause to annex portions of the West Bank for a normalization of relations. But is this all just one more Trump con? The surprise announcement by President Donald Trump that Israel and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) have agreed to the "full normalization" of relations took most experts and observers by surprise. Under normal circumstances, this kind of breakthrough announcement is the byproduct of intense negotiation over time that is usually picked up on by a media programmed to look for telling clues, or primed with timely leaks, neither of which was in play here. Trump's last big foreign policy rollout centered on the announcement of the so-called "deal of the century", a controversial peace plan between Israel and Palestine which appeared to die on the vine primarily over Israeli plans to annex portions of the West Bank ostensibly under Palestinian control. There were no indications...
  29. The European Union paid €36.5 million to groups with ties to the Muslim Brotherhood, and whose agenda involves the Islamization of Europe, the right-wing I&D Faction in the European Parliament revealed. EU parliament budget committee member Joachim Kuhs (I&D) claims: "Apparently, the EU has been funding front organizations with our tax Euros which have close ties to extremist, terror-related organizations like the Muslim Brotherhood. This is a massive scandal, and must be stopped immediately." The figures were unearthed by I&D Vice-Chair Nicolas Bay by searching the EU Financial Transparency System for the years 2014-2019 for the major European Muslim Brotherhood fronts. In these five years, a total of €5,422,678 million went to the European Network against Racism, whose members include the "Forum of European Muslim Youth & Student Organizations" (FEMYSO). FEMYSO is a front organization of the Muslim Brotherhood, the German Bundestag Research Service wrote in 2015....
  30. The U.S. Supreme Court has given the Trump administration another gigantic immigration victory. On Thursday, the nation's highest court ruled 7-2 that the federal government can deport illegal aliens, including those seeking asylum, quickly and with only limited judicial review. The ruling could affect thousands of would-be immigrants now present in the United States. Liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg sided with the Trump administration on the case. Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elana Kagan, both liberals, were the two dissenters. Justice Alito wrote in the opinion. Fox News reported.: "In a decision in the case of Dept. of Homeland Security v. Thuraissigiam, the court ruled that the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA) - which prevents judicial review of the credible fear determination - does not violate the Constitution's Suspension Clause, which protects habeas corpus privileges that allow courts to determine if a person should be released due to...
  31. The Federal Reserve is conducting experiments with a hypothetical digital dollar for research purposes, though it hasn't yet committed to issuance that would require a formal policy process involving the government and other stakeholders, Governor Lael Brainard said Thursday. In addition to the Fed's own internal work, research teams from the Boston Fed and Massachusetts Institute of Technology are engaged in a "multi-year effort to build and test a hypothetical digital currency oriented to central bank uses," she said. "Lessons from this collaboration will be published, and any codebase that is developed through this effort will be offered as open-source software for anyone to use for experimentation," Brainard said, according to the text of her remarks prepared for delivery to a virtual technology event. James Cunha, the senior vice president at the Boston Fed overseeing the project, said the first stage will be technologists from the reserve bank and MIT working together to...
  32. The Russian Foreign Ministry's spokeswoman said on Thursday that Moscow has seen evidence of outside meddling in the unrest currently engulfing neighboring Belarus. But Maria Zakharova said Russia is not one of the guilty parties. The diplomat told a briefing that "unprecedented pressure" is being exerted by individual foreign actors. She insisted that their goal is to destabilize the situation and split society in the landlocked Eastern European country. At the same time, however, Zakharova emphasized that Moscow is concerned about the violence witnessed on the streets of Belarusian cities and towns since last Sunday's controversial presidential elections. She added that Russia is seeking the resolution of issues surrounding 33 Russian private security contractors who were arrested in Minsk last month. "We expect that professional cooperation by the investigative committees, prosecutor generals' offices and other agencies of the two countries will help clear up the situation...
  33. In 2018, Sara Netanyahu was charged with fraud and breach of ethics in a case that her lawyer branded as an attempt to bring down her husband, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. She eventually admitted to the misuse of funds and paid a $15,000 fine. Sara Netanyahu, wife of embattled Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, declared that the ongoing protests against her husband had traumatized her and the family. "I am a battered woman and my children are battered", she claimed, referring to demonstrations during which people have demanded that her husband resign. The 61-year-old also stated that she had experienced sexual violence, referring to penis balloons carried by some protesters, as well as placards with vulgar and aggressive statements and online posts. "I certainly feel that I have experienced sexual violence," Sara Netanyahu told Channel 12, adding that she felt unsafe and concerned for her welfare. The former flight attendant filed a police complaint against...
  34. North Carolina public health officials have announced a major reporting error in the number of coronavirus tests conducted since the start of the pandemic. North Carolina overcounted its tally of completed coronavirus tests by 200,000 since the start of the pandemic, state officials announced Wednesday, blaming most of the error on a processing lab. The error doesn't affect key measures such as the percentage of positive test results, they said. Mandy Cohen, secretary of the state's Department of Health and Human Services, pinned the brunt of the blame on LabCorp Diagnostics for providing North Carolina with two different daily testing count numbers when the clinical lab network submitted the data electronically and manually. "The positive cases are reported electronically," Cohen said in an interview. "Those continue to be accurate. The number that we are correcting today is just the total cumulative lab tests."
  35. At Tollbrae Primary School, parents are not allowed into the playground under new rules to limit the spread of COVID-19. Nine-year-old Caleb Cowan was looking wistfully through the gates of Tollbrae Primary School in Airdrie. A few minutes earlier, he had watched his younger brother walk through the gates alone, but Caleb has to wait until Thursday to meet his friends, some of whom he hasn't seen for almost five months. Scotland's schools are bringing back different year groups each day this week - ready for full-time schooling for everyone next Monday. "I've been enjoying playing Nintendo Wii Mario and Sonic at the Olympic Games," Caleb says when asked for the best thing about almost five months of school. He knows he will have to keep socially distanced from teachers and staff in school, but not from his classmates. "If I run into my best friend I'll give him the biggest hug ever," he said.
  36. Police have been helping to implement a three-day lockdown in Auckland since midday Wednesday as teams of health workers raced to find the cluster's origin. A coronavirus cluster in Auckland has risen to 17 cases, New Zealand health officials said Wednesday, raising the prospect of an extended lockdown in the country's biggest city to battle the resurgent virus. National health chief Ashley Bloomfield said there were 13 new confirmed infections, all linked to four family members found on Tuesday, ending New Zealand's record of 102 days without community transmission of the disease. Police have been helping to implement a three-day lockdown in Auckland since midday Wednesday as teams of health workers raced to find the cluster's origin and ramped up testing in the city. Bloomfield said among the new cases was a student at one of New Zealand's largest high schools, attended by more than 3,000 children.
  37. A vintage clothing store in Georgia is getting backlash online for a promotion blasted as "racist" that waived a $20 fee for non-white shoppers. In a since-deleted Facebook post, Civvies on Broughton in Savannah said it would require a $20 refundable deposit to book an appointment at the boutique, while people of color would be exempt from the new policy. "As a mostly white staff with white ownership, we do not feel comfortable upholding a digital and financial barrier which could prevent BIPOC from shopping at our store at this time on top of the limitations already made by online booking," the store announced last week. The shop, which sells new and "recycled" clothing, told potential white customers that they could decline to pay the deposit, but would be contacted by a booking manager to "discuss other options," the post read. "If you are white and refuse to put down a deposit because you believe our policy is unethical you will not be accepted for an appointment," the store's...
  38. First appearances can be deceiving, and one of the latest comet discoveries by SOHO is the perfect example of that! SOHO is no stranger to discovering new comets - via the NASA-funded Sungrazer Project, the observatory has discovered over 4,000 previously unknown comets since launch in 1995. Most of SOHO's comet discoveries can be categorized into families, or groups, the most famous being the "Kreutz" sungrazer group which accounts for over 85% of the Project discoveries. Only around 4% -some 175 comets- do not appear to belong to any known group or comet family. However, these are often among the most interesting comets and this most recent discovery -SOHO's 4,049th comet- was no exception! The comet was first spotted on August 5th, 2020, by amateur astronomer Worachate Boonplod. At discovery, it was just a tiny faint smudge near the edge of the C3 coronagraph images recorded SOHO's Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) instrument. As it neared the Sun over the next day...
  39. Joe Biden was one of the U.S. Senate's leading segregationists; and he was condemned by the NAACP for it in 1977 hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee, but he has claimed instead to have participated in anti-segregation sit-ins, which were led by black ministers all of whom were conveniently deceased at the time when he made those assertions, and so they could not be asked whether he had participated. He was making those assertions while running against Bernie Sanders, whom the Chicago Tribune showed in their photo during the 1960s being arrested as a college student for his peacefully demonstrating against Chicago's segregationist policy at the time. Sanders in his Presidential campaign didn't brag about it; only Biden bragged about his anti-segregationist activity, though it was fictitious. So Biden swamped Sanders in the South Carolina primary on February 29th — the turning-point in the 2020 Democratic Presidential primaries — where most of the voters were Blacks, who...
  40. The finish of stage 2 of the Critérium du Dauphiné was battered by a brutal hailstorm on Thursday afternoon, catching out a chunk of the peloton as they rode to the finish atop the Col de Porte and the crowds along the road. Primož Roglič (Jumbo-Visma) had long since taken the stage victory and overall race lead, but even the Slovenian was affected by the storm, his wife and young child forced to seek shelter in the car of Cyclingnews reporter Peter Cossins Meanwhile, the podium ceremony was cut short after the inflatable roof collapsed just as Egan Bernal (Team Ineos) was receiving the white jersey for best young rider. Deceuninck-QuickStep domestique Tim Declercq posted a photo to Instagram of vicious-looking welts on his back suffered after taking hits from the hail, while B&B Hotels-Vital Concept neo-pro Maxime Chevalier had a similar injury.
  41. The youth who had allegedly posted the content has been arrested by the city police. 60 cops have sustained injuries due to stone and bottle pelting. Three people were killed in Bengaluru after police opened fire as clashes broke out in parts of the city on Tuesday night after a youth allegedly posted derogatory content inciting hatred on Facebook. Members of the minority community pelted stones at the residence of Congress MLA Akhanda Shrinivasa Murthy, DJ Halli and KG Halli police stations. The youth, who is said to be associated with the Congress lawmaker, has been arrested. Among the three dead persons, two have been identified as Wajid Khan (20) and Yaseen Pasha (20). The third person remains unidentified. The bodies are currently kept at the Bowring Hospital morgue as the authorities will conduct Covid-19 tests and post-mortem before handing them over to the family members.
  42. A scary attack between a young bald eagle and a woman took place along Lake Superior Thursday - and it was all caught on video, as FOX 21's Dan Hanger reports. The aggressive bald eagle was seen attacking the woman Thursday morning just 100 yards away from the Cascade Lodge and Restaurant along Highway 61 in Lutsen. Head Kitchen Manager Bernie Banks ran to help the woman — a guest at the lodge — using his chef's jacket to safely stop the raptor from charging on. "I just took off my jacket and threw it over him and tried my best to get him off of her while not hurting the bird or hurting her anymore without me getting hurt, alright," Banks said.
  43. It's Kamala With protests against police brutality raging and activists pushing for criminal justice reform, Joe Biden picked a former a tough-on-crime prosecutor as his running mate. The selection of Senator Kamala Harris isn't exactly surprising, but it's a reminder of how disconnected the Democratic establishment is from this current moment. What does Senator Harris's record on Israel look like? Perhaps JTA's Ron Kampeas summed it best when he wrote that "she's more AIPAC Than J Street." Upon arriving in the Senate she criticized former President Obama for failing to veto a UN Security Council resolution on Israeli settlements, then cosponsored a bill that challenged the right of the United Nations to condemn settlement expansion. In 2017, she attended AIPAC's annual policy conference and told the audience, "Our defense relationship is critical to both nations, which is why I support the United States' commitment to provide Israel with $38 billion in military assistance over the...
  44. Riverdale Nursing Home in the Bronx appears, on paper, to have escaped the worst of the coronavirus pandemic, with an official state count of just four deaths in its 146-bed facility. The truth, according to the home, is far worse: 21 dead, most transported to hospitals before they succumbed. "It was a cascading effect," administrator Emil Fuzayov recalled. "One after the other." New York's coronavirus death toll in nursing homes, already among the highest in the nation, could actually be a significant undercount. Unlike every other state with major outbreaks, New York only counts residents who died on nursing home property and not those who were transported to hospitals and died there. That statistic could add thousands to the state's official care home death toll of just over 6,600. But so far the administration of Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo has refused to divulge the number, leading to speculation the state is manipulating the figures to make it appear it is doing better than...
  45. Governor Kim Reynolds says an initial estimate indicates 10 million acres of Iowa cropland "was impacted" by yesterday's storm. "This morning I had a farmer reach out to me to say that this was the worst wind damage to crops and farm buildings that he has ever seen across the state in such a wide area," Reynolds said during a news conference late this morning. According to the U.S.D.A., 23.4 million acres was seeded with corn and soybeans this spring, so this early estimate indicates 43 percent of Iowa's 2020 corn and soybean crop has been damaged or destroyed.
  46. Oregon State Police are leaving Portland after a two-week assignment to help protect a federal courthouse that's been a target of protesters during months of conflict in Oregon's largest city. The state police are "continually reassessing our resources and the needs of our partner agencies and at this time we are inclined to move those resources back to counties where prosecution of criminal conduct is still a priority," Capt. Timothy R. Fox told television stations. "Last night was our last night in Portland." Nights of unrest that increasingly targeted the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse previously prompted President Donald Trump to dispatch U.S. agents to guard the building in July, which reinvigorated Black Lives Matter demonstrations and often ended in violent clashes.
  47. Billionaire fashion mogul Les Wexner has agreed to answer written deposition questions to prove he had no knowledge of an extortion scheme by Jeffrey Epstein accuser Virginia Giuffre in a legal battle between her and Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz. In a newly unsealed letter to a Manhattan federal judge, Wexner's attorneys said they offered as a compromise to have him answer written questions related to Dershowitz's claim that Giuffre tried to extort money from him because of his ties to Epstein. They added that Dershowitz viewed the proposal as "unacceptable" and they knew he would oppose their motion for the written deposition. In a legal battle with Giuffre, Dershowitz is hoping to show that she tried to extort Wexner, the former head of Victoria's Secret's parent company who has ties to Epstein. Giuffre, who says she was abused by Epstein in the early 2000s, alleged the multimillionaire pedophile lent her out to be abused by other powerful men in his orbit, including...
  48. The government has quietly removed 1.3m coronavirus tests from its data because of double counting, raising fresh questions about the accuracy of the testing figures. In the government's daily coronavirus update on Wednesday, it announced it had lowered the figure for "tests made available" by about 10% and discontinued the metric. An update on the page read: "An adjustment of -1,308,071 has been made to the historic data for the 'tests made available' metric. The adjustments have been made as a result of more accurate data collection and reporting processes recently being adopted within pillar 2." The Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC) said the changes affected data reported between 14 May and 12 August. It said there had been "a double-counting of test kits that had been dispatched", "which had not been removed from the lab's processed data".
  49. Several explosions were reported across the Gaza Strip on Friday local time for the third consecutive night, as multiple Hamas sites were targeted. Explosions were reported east of the Shujaiya neighborhood of Gaza and Khan Younis, as well as in Deir al-Balah. There were also reports of artillery fire and helicopters. Artillery strikes were reported in Sufa, east of An Nahda, Sharabul Asal and Fukhari. Three missiles struck defense sites east of Khan Younis, while chopper strikes were reported east of Shujaiya. ​According to some reports, a Hamas defense site was also targeted by the Israel Defense Forces (IDF). Israeli helicopters are also firing missiles at various targets.
  50. President Trump on Thursday announced the U.S. is helping to support the full normalization of ties between Israel and the United Arab Emirates, a breakthrough in relations in the Middle East and part of the administration's efforts to shore up support against Iran. The move will also halt efforts by Israel to annex territory in the West Bank that was outlined in Trump's plan for peace between Israelis and Palestinians, but widely opposed by the international community and Arab world, according to the announcement on Twitter. The statement read: "As a result of this diplomatic breakthrough and at the request of President Trump and with the support of the United Arab Emirates, Israel will suspend declaring sovereignty over areas outlined in the President's Vision for Peace and focus its efforts now on expanding ties with other countries in the Muslim world." The Trump administration has made Israel a cornerstone of its foreign policy, frequently touting its decision to move the U.S....